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says that mr. obama wants big government, not a big economy. >> republicans have tried to persuade the president of the need for a course correction. but weeks of negotiations have shown that his commitment to big government is simply too great to lead to the kind of long-term reforms we need. >> question. when the negotiations started, president obama was looking for a big deal. $4 trillion in spending cuts and tax hikes. has the big deal turned into a big fizzle, pat buchanan? >> it has not, john. did it for awhile but now it is back, and we're talking about something close to adds 4 trillion deal. the president is deep in negotiations with boehner and cantor, and here are the terms. you raise the debt ceiling, at the same time there are 3 trillion in cuts, and they deal with social security and medicare. there is no revenue enhancement. however, you get together some kind of commission which what it does, john, it drops tax rates in return for giving away these deductions, exemptions, allowances, breaks, which in effect is pure reaganism. there's one problem with that. there's a
>> susie: a big triple-digit rally on wall street, thanks to big profits from corporate america and a breathrough in those debt talks in washington. >> tom: then, after the closing bell, apple is top banana in the company reports staggering earnings as consumers buy a record 20 million iphones. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 19. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a banner day for blue chips. the dow surged more than 200 points, its best one-day performance this year. at the close, the dow added 202 points, the nasdaq rose 61 and the s&p 500 up 21 points. then after the bell, susie, apple did it again, posting stunning earnings. >> susie: tom, we're running out of adjectives to describe the amazing growth at apple. it earned $7.79 a share in its fiscal third quarter, crushing estimates by almost $2. revenues also came in better than expected, up 82% to $28.5 billion. and that growth comes as consumers keep s
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
the hacking happened. it is a big acts, but i do not think it solves the real issue and news international. >> i am satisfied that rebecca -- her leadership in the business and her standard of ethics, her standard of conduct throughout her career are very good. >> with big consumer company after big consumer company pulling their advertising from quoted news of the world," the commercial future -- from "news of the world," the commercial future was looking bleak. >> it is going to be investigated. there must be a full judicial inquiry. >> here is the other newspaper jewel acquired by rupert murdoch in 1969," the sun." could there be a sunday without a murdoch tabloid? unthinkable, surely. >> despite today's announcement, the fallout from the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policem
of winning back the house, they don't want to go there. republicans have a big flank of new members elected on a pledge of no new taxes. nobody is dealing with reality. anybody on this panel, two of us could make a deal, but they cannot. >> why can they not make a deal, charles? >> you saw it in the clip you showed. nancy pelosi is the classic definition of a reaction. liberal. no changes in programs, entitlements. -- classic definition of a reactionary at liberal. no genocide programs, entitlements. if you all make -- note changes in programs, entitlements. if you don't make changes, he will wreck the economy, and everybody over the age of nine knows that. is that they are not willing to means test -- if they are not willing to means test entitlements, which you think and liberal alike, who always argue in terms of sharing the sacrifice and the rich bearing the burden, nothing will happen. >> colby? >> you just had exhibit number one of why they have not been able to reach a deal, as my friend charles expressed. if you start out with nancy pelosi and the position of republicans on tax incr
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payment on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have sd to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of what your plan is to get the debt ceiling raised through whatever mechanisms they can thk about anshow me a plan in terms of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm ready to move. even if it requires some tough decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the nextouple of days we'll se this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want to see washington do its job. >> charlie: president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan proposed by house republicans. >> my expectation is thayou will probay see the h
chat or call without leaving facebook. this is big for facebook. this is not so revolutionary for the users. >> are these the kind people that actually want to have video chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of a work scenario. >> with any audience, this kind of a video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions because if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot have a video chat with you while i'm on the bus. this is by definition a rich interface for a minority of your communications. nonetheless, they spoke with like this to happen within facebook and not have you leave facebook and have you use your skype program. >> one thing that seems to be clear is that the business side, this comes in the same week that google has announced its social network is try to take on facebook as well. who was winning that battle? >> if you measure this on sheer numbers, no one touches facebook. during the announcement, they mentioned they have 750 million users. that is a big jump fro
-- it has big tax increases in it and all the spending cuts will happen in the out years. well, how many times do politicians think they can pull that one over on the american people? >> reporter: the split among republicans made it difficult for party leaders to determine just what might pass the house. whatever it turns out to be, it still must be acceptable to senate democrats and ultimately to the president. this morning, the senate's majority leader democrat harry reid challenged house speaker john boehner to take matters in hand. >> right now, i'm at a point where we need to hear from the house of representatives. we've planned to go forward over here, but until we hear from the house all our work is for naught. i await word from the speaker. >> reporter: in the meantime, there's general agreement that translating the complex gang of six plan into legislation and votes before august second, is likely unrealistic. that could put the short-term emphasis back on a senate backup plan to let the president raise the debt ceiling on his own pending some final, long-term agreement. >> ifil
opportunity to do something big. >> suarez: but after five straight days of talks with congressional leaders, president obama conceded today something big remains elusive. >> we are obviously running out of time. and so what i've said to the members of congress is that you need, over the next 24 to 36 hours, to give me some sense of what your plan is to get the debt ceiling raised through if they show me a serious plan, i'm ready to move, even if it requires some tough decisions on my part. >> suarez: the president had previously insisted on extending the debt ceiling through 2012 past next year's election. but after thursday's talks, he settled for asking congressional leaders to review three options with their members. the first-- the so-called "grand bargain" that mr. obama favors-- would cut deficits by about $4 trillion dollars, including spending cuts and new tax revenues. a medium-range plan would aim to reduce the deficit by about half that amount. the smallest option would cut between $1 trillion and $1.5 trillion dollars without increased tax revenue or any medicare and medicaid cu
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
a big jobs generator, the place they call the space coast. but in particular today i spent some time talking with travis thompson who has spent 33 years here at the kennedy space center working on the shuttle program. he is the lead technician on the clogout crew, the guys who button them up, the astronauts, strap them in, shut the door and send them off to space. he and his team, it was a very emotional day for them. as they were finishing up their job they had put together a series of cards with messages talking about their appreciation for the program, their patted rotism and frankly -- patriotism and their sadness, and the final word was god bless america, held by travis thompson himself. this is travis thompson's last day on the job, after 100 shuttle missions, getting the crews strapped in and ready to go to space, tomorrow he has no job. where he is going to go to work. as he said, my job is putting human beings in spacecraft to go to space. i don't see a lot of prospects for doing that somewhere else. so it is a poignant moment for him. >> so finally, miles, look back with us
to the business, it's search! >> tom: corporate earnings season heats up with big numbers from google and a healthy quarter from j.p. morgan. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, july 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. almost $7 billion in sales equals another blockbuster quarter for google, a blowout beginning to earnings for technology companies. susie, internet search and search advertising continue driving the big profits at the web giant. >> susie: tom, google's earnings surged almost 40% and google stock soared as well, up over $60 or 12% after the closing bell. google earned $8.74 a share in the second quarter, about $1 more than analyst estimates. google continued its hiring blitz, adding 2,400 employees during the quarter. paid clicks, or the number of times internet users clicked on the company's ads, rose 18%, in line w
. but it remains to be seen whether there will be a big enough reduction in great that for that to happen, and whether they have managed to build a fire wall around greece. >> do you think this deal is just another sticking plaster? >> i think it will be difficult for this deal completely to save greece. it is not clear, because we are not seeing all the details. the reduction in debt that private debt holders are expected to take is not that big. it is a reduction of 20% in the net present value. unless the official debt is good to come in with gigantic amounts of money -- greece is going to still have a giant debt burden. it is difficult because the greek growth rate is not high and the government has trouble collecting taxes. unless greece suddenly becomes much more productive and competitive, it is likely they will have to come back and do another debt reduction further down . >> is this bailout ultimately political by leaders who want to save the eurozone, red and economic? >> when it comes to saving the eurozone, the two are intertwined. you could be more cynical and say it is to do
on the debt. so let's hear him say in public once. >> why is it that when he offered the big deal, the $4 trillion deal -- >> the grand bargain. >> the grand bargain, republicans backed away from it. >> when did he offer that? >> he offered it last week. >> where? >> he did it publicly. bamut give me a number. >> in a matter of two days, republicans backed away from that and said they did not want it. >> you accept everything he says, the $4 trillion deal. if you do not have a single item in it that you can enunciate. >> i am not at the table. perhaps you are, but i am not. >> how can you expect america to accept something in which he explains nothing? >> can we hear from mark? >> can this marriage be saved. >> i hope not. >> john boehner believed there was a $4 trillion deal. john boehner is not a naive newcomer to washington. he has been around. but john boehner also knows some history. the last time we had a major budget deal that by every definition work was bill clinton in 1993. without a single republican voting party in the house and senate. it included twice as much in tax increas
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
. >> it is not as big as a risk associated with drinking alcohol or being overweight which are things you can do something about. >> of this study adds to their understanding. >> now to the phone hacking scandal which rocked the british establishment have led to an fbi investigation. senior former employees have accused james murdock of being mistaken in one of his answers to the select committee of parliament earlier this week. rupert murdoch got a boost when a saudi prince that was the largest share of the company outside of the murdoch family voiced his support. nick, tell us, news corp shares are up for the first time in about two weeks. but the independent directors have hired their own lawyer. or why? >> we are getting mixed signals from the board. they have hired lawyers to protect shareholder value and to guard against maybe their own exposure. there have also been some reports that some of the more independent directors are thinking about ways in which rupert murdoch could give up his title of ceo at the company. this is a board that he controls pretty firmly. >> who is on the board? >>
! why is he introducing it? >> i think the president is acting in good faith. i think he wants a big deal. i think he will take cuts that contracts won't want and take taxes. because his presidency and the future of the country -- he believes -- [everyone talking at once] >> socialistic. that what you're saying. >> vaguely socialistic, yes. >> when they came out with the report he said -- >> what is that report? >> that's a report that deals with the long-term deficit problems of this country. >> they recommend taxation, do they not. >> they had a whole series of recommendations, and the president said i will stand by what they did, except they're still waiting for him to stand by them. >> he's never taken it seriously, in not in his budget, not in his budget state, know when bowl simpson came city. not when they wanted a clean debt limit increase. so that he is winning a debate over the fiscal future of the country is astonishing! and. >> but he's keeping something else off page one! what is it? >> this is a genuine. >> the unemployment problem? it doesn't even figure in this. >> co
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
. this is big for facebook. i do not know it is revolutionary for the user. >> all the people using facebook -- i understand a lot of people are deciding they do not want to use facebook. do they want to have a chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of their work scenario. >> with this audience, with any audience, this kind of video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions. if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot do a video chat with you while i am on the bus going to work. that is complicated. i can always do a text chat. this is a rich interface for a minority of your communications. but facebook once those to happen within facebook, and not have you leave to use your skype program. >> i think i understand the technical side of this. one thing that seems to be clear from the business side is it comes in the same week that google announced its social network. it is trying to take on facebook as well. who is winning that battle? >> it depends how you measure it. on sheer numbers, n
sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insurgent groups that are willing to talk about this option. they have been fighting for three decades in afghanistan. people are tired. i think right now what we're seeing is some elements willing, some elements unwilling. based on the fact that many of them believe they are winning right now, that the u.s. and other allies are leaving, i think it is unlikely that they will cut a deal now. not wait it out -- why not wait it out? >> to what extent is the taliban looking at things like this letter-signing, seeing
. getting his tradpain treated properly has made a big difference for both of them. >> his mood has changed. i never knew how he would be hour.our to ou >> the study today is prompting experts to urge doctors everywhere to consider whether a simple painkillers may be a better solution. ♪ >> in haiti, it has been a year and have since the devastating earthquake killed more than 250,000 people and destroyed the capital. 600,000 people still live in settlement camps. many face a daily struggle for survival. he tells the story in his new book. for three decades, he has worked to help the people of the island nation. he recently joined me from new york to discuss their current plight. thank you for joining us. you have been a champion for haiti for many years, long before the earthquake happened. you describe in your latest book the resilience and suffering of the people. what is the situation now a? what should be happening? >> the situation in haiti remains difficult. we're in the midst of and maybe in the early stages of a cholera epidemic. it is related to the earthquake and destruction of
. >> he is a big -- severely malnourished. >> with the right supplement, he and so many others can survive. >> we are saving children's lives with the generosity of the british public. but we can also help these communities rebuild their lives, restock their animals. and when they finally rains, harvest the water. that is equally important. >> help came too late for this baby, buried at just 20 days old. the sharp twist around his grave stop hyenas from digging up his body. -- the sharp twigs and around his grave stop hyenas from the king of his body. -- from digging up his body. >> now a woman who has spent her career stumping us all. you probably do not know laura jacobson's name, but chances are you have picked up one of proposals. decided it is time to put your dictionary on the shelf. she talks about what it takes to make a career in crossword. >> i got it, ok. my name is laura jacobson and i am a chris of herbalist -- cruciverbalist, which means, someone who makes of crossword puzzles. cruci coming from crossword and verbal is coming from word. -- a verbalist coming from word. margar
into trouble, it is simply too big to be rescued. italy does have impressive designers and world famous brands. what this masks is low productivity and low growth. some of those who oppose today's austerity package fear that without growth, italy cannot escape its problems. >> we need to put the debt under control but this package is not enough and you cannot put that under control if you do not promote growth. we would be back to squre one. -- square one. >> most of the savings will not take effect until 2013. borrowing costs are close to being unsustainable. the austerity package comes here to italy's lower house tomorrow and it is expected to be passed. it is causing concern but the real focus remains away from here in greece and there are deep divisions about how to organize a second bailout for that country. >> of italy, the home of antiquity, facing many problems. no such concern for an antique manuscript written by jane austen. it sold for $1.50 million. we have more on "the watsons". >> an exit from the unfinished novel. describing the heroine, the daughter of a clergyman. , also atin'
give it a big advantage when it comes to election time? thousands of mourners have flocked to the eastern bosnian town to mark the 16th anniversary of the massacre were 8000 bosnian men and boys were killed. them 16 years on, the pain is just as raw. a mother overwhelmed by anguished at finding the remains of her son. it we will pelvic bones and the fragments of his lower jaw that -- was all that could be recovered. at 29 years old, he was one of those killed back in 1995. today, just another green the coffin lowered into the ground. over 600 were buried on this anniversary, identified through dna analysis. statistics perhaps, but for those grieving, sons, fathers, husbands. it was the worst atrocity in europe since the second world war. thousands of bosnian muslims had grounded into the united nations safe haven as the war raged on, but the dutch troops were easily overrun. the men and boys were led off to be slaughtered. around 8000 of them within the space of five days. it is the only part of the balkan wars to be labeled genocide. the bosnian serb commander was filmed r
in the future. >> susie: let's talk a little. we were talking to a big institutional shareholder who is very concern body the outlook for this stock. would you buy news corp at $16. is this an opportunity for investors, or is it too risky? >> near term with the $5 billion share buy back that mr. murdoch announced tuesday that begins on august 5th, i think near term, it's probably a buy at news corp, but long term, you have to wait until the dust settles. there's too much uncertainty, and potential liability that the company and senior managers are facing. that want to invest long term. >> susie: there was an article in "newsweek" written by carl bernstein under the title, murdoch's watergate and saying that this is the beginning of the end of the murdoch empire. your thoughts on that. could that be the case? >> i don't think the empire is going to crumble any time soon. but what i think we are seing is perhaps an end to the celebrity type cuture ta inculcated journalism on both sides of the atlantic and has been mainly stimulateed and driven by the murdoch approach to get the news at any cos
a big prize from the failure of the takeover. bskyb's share prices falling around 20% over the past nine days. taking away almost 3 billion pounds from the value of the company. what has rupert murdoch lost? >> this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire 100% of the business which is extraordinarily good prospects, which has a growth trajectory which is well understood. it would have substantially increased the size of the company from around 20% to 25%. >> we may think mr. murdoch is big in the u.k., but he is much bigger in the u.s. the worry for him is that u.s. senators are now on his days following the accusation that 9/11 victims and other families phones or hacked. >> if that is true and if there was any access to any of the victims records, then, you know, in my mind, it would probably be the most invasive and perverse information in's the final moments of their lives and a tremendous innovation to their families as well. >> 1989, the dawn of television's new age. >> mr. murdoch would see himself, rightly many would say, as the founder of bskyb. so to be told by politicia
the big stumbling block right now is the president's insistence on raising taxes. and i think we need to go back two years ago in 2009 when president obama was asked in indiana do you raise tacks during a recession. and he very eloquently i think answered the question. and he said no, don't do that. and he laid out the economic reasons for not doing that. now look, this economy is begging for mercy. we're at 9.2% unemployment. an i think it's time to move off of this notion that somehow the remedy is to increase taxes on job creators. let's focus in on these cuts. let's make thoughtful and wise cuts and let's come together on this in a fashion that makes sense all the way around. >> ifill: listening to both sides of this debate it seems one man's taxes are another man's revenue increases and it's a question of whether you are talking about raising net taxes or not -- or increasing revenues at all. you could imagine that the average viewer trying to make sense of this doesn't know which definition you are talking about. >> here's the definition i think that should be guiding us. the jo
of thing. >> yes, she made a big point in the hearings this afternoon saying she hadn'tbeen to downing street while david cameron was prime minister and contrasted it with the fac she'd been there a l under gordon brown and tony blair and the reason she hasn't been to downing street is she doesn't have to. they see each other ithe country side in the little village and easier to meethere an gng to downing street and have it in the papers. >> the solution to bad journalism has been more journalism and government has been far and ay bystanders and i don't think the committee hearing did a lot to change that. i think the lines of inquiry will continue to advance will come from the guardian and new york times and will come from the wall street journal and probably not from the mps of parliament. >> charlie: but including the wall street journal. >> wall street journal i thought was hilarious the other day saying there's an editorial saying you're all doing overkill there's so much and all hard-hitting. you have a $40 billion company to close a 168-year-old newspaper and ten people arrested
recession in europe, and a big drop in the value of government debt. the test did not consider the impact of a sovereign default. investors widely expect greece to default on its debt at some point in the future. against those scenarios, the banks have to show how much money or spare capital they have to withstand any losses. >> they still do not fully reflect what the market is saying today about the worst case for greek debt and possibly italian debt. they are better and tougher. the question is whether they are tough enough. >> eight banks have failed the test. five are from spain, two are from greece. there's also an austrian bank. they will be working with the government over the weekend on plans to strengthen their balance sheets. all four u.k. banks were given a clean bill of health. investors will be going over the details released today to run their own stress tests. they will give their verdict on monday morning when european markets open for business. >> europe is hardly alone in trying to get their financial house in order. today president obama said that time was running out
that that is a big if at this point but there are a lot of questions. i think the employees at news corp. media properties are nervous, shareholders are nervous. there are questions about what this means for the future of the company. a lot of questions i am hearing is where is the push stock -- the push back on rupert murdoch? shareholders have said this is like a family business, this is a public business. there needs to be strong vertex in place to make sure whether it is an independent board of directors, someone comes in and challenges rupert murdoch on some of these issues going forward. -- there needs to be some strong checks in place. i think that investors want to see that. >> thank you for joining us. president obama said that negotiations over the debt ceiling have reached the 11th hour. in a statement, he praised a new proposal that would cut 4 trillion dollars in the debt over 10 years through a mix of tax increases and spending cuts. israeli forces have stopped a french-flagged boat going toward the gaza strip in an attempt to break the blockade. the boat has now been taken to an
-- >> what are you suggesting? >> exactly what you think. >> paul tsongas had cancer. there was a big difference between cancer and migraines. if we are going to hold up a standard that if you have a headache that knocks you out for an hour or two, you cannot be president, fdr and kennedy, who had addison's disease, and eisenhower, who had a bad heart, would never have been president of the united states. i am not sure that is the position any of us would want to take. i think her answer was good, i think based on the evidence -- is their behavioral evidence of this woman not being able -- >> just be a cautionary. >> well, cautionary is fine -- >> i don't know the capitol hill physicians but i don't think it is fair to imply that somehow this is a less qualified individual. >> i'm not saying that. >> what about rick perry? >> rick . looks more and more like he is going to come into the race. -- rick perry looks more and more like he is going to come into the race. mike huckabee, a conservative finalist in 2008 against john mccain, has taken a shot at him, saying he will be the champio
not a big part of the investor focus until last week. >> one group has accused rupert murdoch of treating the company like a family candy jar. do you think there could be growing unease among investors? >> for context, these are relatively small institutional investors. they have added this to their libby of complaints. we are picking up concern about corporate governance. -- this has added to their litany of complaints. this sense that they failed to get a grip on the scandal has been running for so long, this is quite concerning to investors not just in terms of legal exposure but why was management not able to handle this better? that is changing people's appraisal of potential succession to mr. murdoch and the families' chances of appointing their own chosen successor. this is a company controlled by mr. murdoch and his family. >> if he was to sell or close to u.k. newspapers, would that help the overall business? would that isolate the problem, do you think? >> this is an idea was pitched to news corp. before the scandal because newspapers are slower growing that fox news, the chain
... both: you're saving toucans! (toucan squawks) ♪ you never do know what's around the bend big adventure or a brand-new friend ♪ ♪ when you're curious like curious george ♪ ♪ swing! ♪ ♪ well, every day ♪ every day ♪ ♪ is so glorious ♪ glorious ♪ george! ♪ and everything ♪ everything ♪ ♪ is so wondrous ♪ wondrous ♪ ♪ there's more to explore when you open the door ♪ ♪ and meet friends like this, you just can't miss ♪ ♪ i know you're curious ♪ curious ♪ ♪ and that's marvelous ♪ marvelous ♪ ♪ and that's your reward ♪ you'll never be bored ♪ if you ask yourself, "what is this?" ♪ ♪ like curious... ♪ like curious... curious george. ♪ oh... captioning sponsored by nbc/universal ooh, ah! narrator: george was enjoying his absolute favorite dream. (laughing) it put him in the mood for grapes.
disaffected members of his own party. there's no big mechanism, no easy mechanism for ousting him. so andy has e advantage of the holiday. all of this will have time to cooldown. ed milleband, he's right, he's made good progress, but the polls show that although there's been a kind of windy-danging to the tories, the labor has not picked up. the lib-dems, doing badly until now, have gained a little bit. people are not convinced by milleband. i think the relations between the parties remain pretty much unchanged, but ihink these problems have not gone away for cameron, they've just gone io the slightly longer grass, because the police now have until the fall to decide, for example, whether to lay charges. sohat could happen is that all of this could come back with a vengeance around the time of the annual party conferences. >> let's just break this into parts, charlie. the first , david cameron's short-term problem. and that is this question that his error of judgment in hiring mr. coulson. now, until this affair really broke, you could argue that david cameron led the strongest government in w
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